Sidney Horenstein | World-Class Engineering: Development of the New York City Water Supply

Sidney Horenstein | World-Class Engineering: Development of the New York City Water Supply
Recorded: March 12, 1992

Sidney Horenstein, geologist and retired Coordinator of Environmental Public Programs at the American Museum of Natural History, provides a comprehensive overview of the “arteries, veins, and capillaries” that make up New York City’s water supply system. Horenstein details more than two centuries of work to build, maintain, and manage a supply of clean water for the rapidly growing city, contextualizing the development of the three systems—Croton, Catskill, and Delaware—within the social issues and engineering innovations that have occurred between the use of the original Collect Pond in present-day Chinatown to the ongoing construction of Water Tunnel No. 3.

This lecture was originally presented as part of The Productive Park series, a design study organized in 1992 by The Architectural League, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, and the Parks Council (now New Yorkers for Parks). The study sought innovative ideas for integrating civic infrastructure with neighborhood parks.