Studio as Muse

Exhibition installation.  Photo: David Sundberg

Herzog & de Meuron’s Design for the New Parrish Art Museum
March 12–May 2, 2008
The Urban Center
457 Madison Avenue
New York City

The Architectural League of New York presented an exhibition of Pritzker Prize-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron’s plans for the new Parrish Art Museum from March 12 to May 2, 2008 at the League, 457 Madison Avenue, New York City. Curated and installed by Herzog & de Meuron and first presented at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, NY, in summer 2007, the exhibition displayed one hundred thirty study models, material samples, and short videos detailing the firm’s design process for this innovative new museum building.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the League has produced a set of video interviews with key individuals related to the project. Click here to view these podcasts.

Studio as Muse: Herzog & de Meuron’s Design for the New Parrish was presented as part of an ongoing series of Architectural League exhibitions that investigate the design process of a single significant building. In revealing the different steps that architects take to arrive at a completed design, the exhibitions demystify for the public the way buildings are designed while simultaneously serving as important learning tools for design professionals and students.

The new Parrish Art Museum will comprise 64,000 square feet of new construction in the village of Water Mill on the East End of Long Island and will be Herzog & de Meuron’s first public building on the East Coast. The firm’s design concept reinterprets the artist’s studio, formulating a network of separate but connected galleries in which the Parrish Art Museum’s permanent collection will be installed. The exhibition space is anchored by four galleries inspired by the basic architectural elements of the actual artists’ studios, each of which will examine in depth the work of seminal East End artists: William Merritt Chase, Fairfield Porter, Willem de Kooning, and Roy Lichtenstein. The new building will make extensive use of natural light through a combination of north-facing skylights in the galleries and large expanses of glass throughout, creating a sense of transparency and connection to the remarkable surrounding landscape. In addition to gallery space for the permanent collection and special exhibitions, the new museum will also contain educational facilities, a cafe and an auditorium.

Pritzker-Prize winning architects Herzog & de Meuron are internationally recognized for provocative buildings that consistently explore the boundaries of material experimentation. Informed by sources ranging from fashion to art to landscape, the firm’s work transcends stylistic categorization in its emphasis on process and invention. In addition to the design for the new Parrish Art Museum, recent and current projects of Herzog & de Meuron include 40 Bond Street, New York City; the National Stadium Beijing for the 2008 Olympics; the M.H. DeYoung Memorial Museum, San Francisco. Additional projects include the new development of the Tate Modern, London, projected completion in 2012, as well as the Elbe Philharmonic Hall, Hamburg, projected for completion in 2010.

The presentation of Studio as Muse: Herzog & de Meuron’s Design for the New Parrish Art Museum at the Architectural League was made possible by Ian Schrager Company. League exhibitions and programs are also made possible by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency; and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Additional support is provided by contributions from foundations, corporations, and members of the Architectural League.

Above: Exhibition installation.  Photo: David Sundberg/Esto.

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